Loading...

progress
Your request is being processed...
  • 1. Will Social Security be there for me when I retire?
    Preview
    Terms of Use The future of Social Security is in the spotlight these days. Social Security is primarily financed by payroll taxes. As long as people work, the system will never completely run out of money. However, Social Security is facing an uncertain financial future mainly due to demographics. We're living longer and healthier lives ... and this is good news. When the Social Security program was created in 1935, a 65-year-old had an average life expectancy of 12½ more years; toda  More...
  • 2. What is the difference between a Traditional IRA and a Roth IRA?
    Preview
    Terms of Use IRAs are a great way for you to save for the future. Your IRA can consist of a range of investments from savings accounts, stocks, bonds, and certificates of deposit or share certificates. You can contribute up to a certain limit each year into your IRA and if you're over 50, you are allowed an additional catch up contribution. The tax advantages of a Traditional or Roth IRA depend on your annual income and whether you are covered by your company's retirement plan. B  More...
  • 3. What is a Roth IRA? Who can contribute and what are the limits?
    Preview
    Terms of Use What is a Roth IRA? The purpose of a Roth IRA is to put away money for retirement. To be classified a Roth IRA, the account or annuity must be designated as a Roth IRA when it is set up. An IRA can be a Roth IRA, but neither a SEP IRA nor a SIMPLE IRA can be designated as a Roth IRA. Who can contribute? Generally, you can contribute to a Roth IRA if you have taxable compensation (this can be in the form of wages, salaries, tips, professional fees, bonuses, etc.). Unlike contribut  More...
  • 4. Why should I consider setting up a trust?
    Preview
    Terms of Use People often associate trust funds only with the wealthy. But a trust fund ( trust ) actually can be an effective financial tool for many people in many circumstances. A trust is a separate legal entity that holds property or assets of some kind for the benefit of a specific person, group of people or organization known as the beneficiary ( beneficiaries ). The person creating a trust is called the grantor , donor or settlor . When a trust is established, an individual or corporate   More...
  • 5. How much can I contribute to a 403(b)?
    Preview
    Terms of Use What is a 403(b)? A 403(b) is an employer sponsored retirement savings plan that allows you to save pre-tax dollars for your retirement. A Roth 403(b) permits only after-tax contributions but allows you to diversify your tax risk by letting eligible participants make tax-free withdrawals after retirement. The IRS limits the amount you can contribute each year Participants can contribute up to $17,500 for 2014. This limit is applicable if you're under age 50 as of December 31st  More...
  • 6. What's the maximum contribution to a Roth IRA?
    Preview
    Terms of Use: The maximum allowable contribution to a Roth IRA depends on whether contributions are made only to Roth IRAs or to both traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs. Please see the IRS web site for more information.
  • 7. What should I know about pension plans?
    Preview
    Terms of Use: There are a variety of pension plans offered by private sector employers today. This information offers an explanation of traditional defined benefit pension plans insured by Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC): what they are, how they operate, and the rights and options of the workers covered by them. Table of Contents Traditional Pension Plans Predictable, Secure Lifetime Benefits Trends Pension Plan Provisions Federal Insurance For Your Pension Pension Checklist Other Us  More...
  • 8. Can I deduct my Roth IRA contribution?
    Preview
    Terms of Use: No, contributions to a Roth IRA are not tax deductible. A Roth IRA allows you (if you do not exceed certain income limits) to invest money by making non-deductible contributions that grow tax-deferred.
  • 9. What is the difference between a Conversion Roth IRA and a Regular Roth IRA?
    Preview
    Terms of Use: A Conversion Roth IRA is defined as a Roth IRA that receives money from Traditional IRAs through a conversion, rollover or direct transfer. If an account is designated as a Conversion Roth IRA, then that account can only accept IRA conversion contributions made in a single year. A separate Conversion Roth IRA must be established each year in which an individual desires to convert assets into a Roth IRA. Contributions are permitted until April 15th for the prior tax year.
  • 10. What is a Traditional IRA? Who can contribute and what are the limits?
    Preview
    Terms of Use An IRA is an Individual Retirement Account that provides several tax benefits . IRA accounts can be comprised of fixed income instruments, such as CDs/share certificates and bonds, and stocks and mutual funds, to name just a few options. The Traditional IRA enables individuals to save money in a tax-deferred account. What that means is that the earnings from your IRA account will not be taxed until you begin taking money out of the account. Traditional IRA Snapshot Contributions:   More...
All information provided through this site is intended to be accurate. However, there may be inaccuracies from time to time which we will make every attempt to correct immediately. Information provided is intended to assist you in making decisions and does not eliminate the need to discuss your particular circumstances with a qualified professional.

Rates

Tools and Links

The Link Newsletter

Subscribe for monthly updates!